To mark the 150th anniversary of his birth, we are pleased to present Encounters with Jack B. Yeats a series of Podcasts and Radio Plays that explore Yeats’ work through a contemporary lens.

The six-episode series, which is kindly funded by the Decade of Centenaries Programme (2013-2023), launches on Wednesday 6 October and runs weekly thereafter.

The series features rediscovered original audio of Yeats in conversation with curator Thomas MacGreevy; reenacted source material by Yeats’ peer, the writer and activist Dorothy Macardle; alongside contemporary responses by artists Ruth Clinton & Niamh Moriarty; Seamus Harahan & Owen Kilfeather; theatre practitioner Isabel Claffey; and actors, Peter Broderick, Ultan Burke, Bob Kelly, Ciarán McCauley and Yuji Shimobayashi.

The music for the soundtrack, 'no man's land' was composed by Karen Power.

The series is curated by The Model's Artistic Director, Emer McGarry and writer-researcher, Lara Byrne.

Funded by the Decade of Centenaries Programme (2013-2023)

Episodes

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Encounters with Jack B. Yeats
Episode 3 - Communicating with Prisoners

In the third episode from the series of podcasts, ‘Encounters with Jack B. Yeats,’ from The Model, home of the Niland Collection, a painting by Jack B. Yeats in the Niland Collection, ‘Communicating with Prisoners’ (c.1924) is contextualised against the backdrop of the Irish Civil War.

The oil painting is a transitional work from the artist’s career and portrays seven women as they attempt to communicate with female prisoners imprisoned inside the high bastion tower of Kilmainham Gaol.

In 1923, Kilmainham Gaol was entirely occupied by female political prisoners and these women were Anti-Treaty Republicans, imprisoned here by the Free State Government during the Civil War period (1922-1923). Some of the women in the painting can be identified from contemporary photographs of the time. The second woman from the right in Jack’s painting resembles the republican activist and writer, Dorothy Macardle (1889 -1958).

Communicating With Prisoners by Jack B. Yeats (1871 - 1957)

‘Communicating with Prisoners,’ by Jack B. Yeats, c.1924, oil on canvas, 46 x 61. The Niland Collection, Sligo. ©Estate of Jack B. Yeats, DACs London/IVARO Dublin, 2021

Photograph of Maud Gonne MacBride, Charlotte Despard and Dorothy Macardle as they inspect the burnt-out ruins of a hosiery factory in Balbriggan during the War of Independence in 1920. Dorothy Macardle is wearing a beret and is holding a bag behind her back. Photograph by W.D. Hogan and published in the ‘American Commission on Conditions in Ireland Interim Report,’ 1920. Image courtesy of Kilmainham Gaol Museum/OPW and ©National Museum of Ireland

Photograph of Maud Gonne MacBride, Charlotte Despard and Dorothy Macardle as they inspect the burnt-out ruins of a hosiery factory in Balbriggan during the War of Independence in 1920. Dorothy Macardle is wearing a beret and is holding a bag behind her back. Photograph by W.D. Hogan and published in the ‘American Commission on Conditions in Ireland Interim Report,’ 1920. Image courtesy of Kilmainham Gaol Museum/OPW and ©National Museum of Ireland

In the first part of the episode, a tour guide gives the background and context to Jack’s painting, and this is followed by a reading from Dorothy Macardle’s, ‘The Kilmainham Tortures, Experiences of a Released Prisoner,’ dated 1st May 1923. This 3-page typewritten account is held in Kilmainham Gaol Archive and was used for this podcast courtesy of Kilmainham Gaol Museum/ OPW and ©Estate of Dorothy Macardle, courtesy of Curtis Brown Group Ltd.

Kilmainham Gaol, Photograph taken by Thomas Flewett, Deputy Governor of the Gaol from 1870-87. Image courtesy of Kilmainham Gaol Museum/OPW.

Kilmainham Gaol: The setting of the oil painting, ‘Communicating with Prisoners’ (c.1924) by Jack B. Yeats. Jack took some artistic licence with the composition, omitting the high stone wall and the windows on the lower level of the bastion tower. Photograph taken by Thomas Flewett, Deputy Governor of the Gaol from 1870-87. Image courtesy of Kilmainham Gaol Museum/OPW.

This is Dorothy Macardle’s first-hand account of a particularly terrifying day endured by the women prisoners in Kilmainham Gaol during the Irish Civil War. Access to archival photographs and material used for this episode were made possible through the kind assistance of the staff of Kilmainham Gaol Museum and Brian Crowley, Curator of Collections of Kilmainham Gaol Museum.

This series of podcasts is kindly funded by the Decade of Centenaries Programme and supported by Sligo County Council. Listener discretion is advised for this episode.

Writer & Activist: Dorothy Macardle (1889-1958)

Writer & Activist: Dorothy Macardle (1889-1958)

 

Episode Credits:

‘The Kilmainham Tortures, Experiences of a Released Prisoner,’ by Dorothy Macardle, 1923. This 3-page typewritten essay is held in Kilmainham Gaol Archive and was used for this episode courtesy of Kilmainham Gaol Museum/OPW and © Estate of Dorothy Macardle, courtesy of Curtis Brown Group Ltd.

Tour Guide: written and voiced by Lara Byrne
‘The Kilmainham Tortures, Experiences of a Released Prisoner’:  voiced by Isabel Claffey
* Researcher:  Lara Byrne
* Directed by Isabel Claffey
* Lara Byrne is an Independent Arts Researcher based in the northwest of Ireland.
* Isabel Claffey is the Director of Shared Light Theatre Company. www.sharedlighttheatrecompany.com

Series Credits: 

This series is kindly funded by the Decades of Centenaries Programme (2013-2023)
Episodes introduced by Isabel Claffey
Sound Engineer: Daniel Bannon
Sound Editor: Colm Condron
Soundtrack to Podcast series, ‘no man’s land,’ (2020) composed by Karen Power
Producer & Researcher-writer: Lara Byrne
Curated by the Artistic Director of The Model – Emer McGarry

Encounters with Jack B. Yeats
Episode 2 - Go West

In this second episode from the series of podcasts, ‘Encounters with Jack B. Yeats,’ from The Model, home of the Niland in Sligo, artists, Ruth Clinton and Niamh Moriarty present GO WEST, a short story set on a westbound train, where a wistful young artist shares a cabin with a stoic bureaucrat. The artist is instantly enthralled by the red-haired female civil servant sitting opposite him. Meanwhile, outside the window a magnificent round tower appears in the distance as the train crosses the sea to a remote island.

This radio play was inspired by a painting by Jack B. Yeats, ‘Man on a Train, Thinking,’ (1927) and a grisly ghost story told by the artist at the annual RHA dinner. This surreal comedy plays out between two conflicting projections of Irish national identity as it was being constructed in the early days of Irish Independence. Blending historical research and present-day conspiracies, the train is used as a metaphor for enduring binary debates such as public versus private; progress versus nostalgia; tourism versus conservation and even Dublin versus the rest of Ireland.

Ruth Clinton and Niamh Moriarty are collaborative artists currently living and working between Leitrim, and Sligo. They use performance, video, sound installation and storytelling, along with a detailed research process, to open up spaces of renewed reflection. Ruth and Niamh’s current practice is concerned with Ireland’s complicated relationship with its colonial past. In 2021, they are critically examining our struggle for a sense of national identity as we move through times of great upheaval.

They have recently presented work for Solas Nua, Washington D.C.; the Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College Dublin, and Askeaton Contemporary Arts. This year Ruth and Niamh’s work is supported by the Arts Council of Ireland, Leitrim County Council and Fingal County Council.   

Episode Credits:

GO WEST Radio Play written and produced by Ruth Clinton and Niamh Moriarty
Artist voiced by Peter Broderick
Bureaucrat voiced by Ruth Clinton
Additional voices and sounds by Cormac MacDiarmada and Niamh Moriarty
Music by Aoife Hammond & Ruth Clinton

Series Credits:

This series is kindly funded by the Decades of Centenaries Programme (2013-2023)
Episodes introduced by Isabel Claffey
Sound Engineer: Daniel Bannon
Sound Editor: Colm Condron
Soundtrack to Podcast series, ‘no man’s land,’ (2020) composed by Karen Power
Producer & researcher-writer: Lara Byrne
Curated by Emer McGarry

Encounters with Jack B. Yeats
Episode 1 - Jack B. Yeats 150

In this first episode from the series of podcasts, ‘Encounters with Jack B. Yeats,’ from The Model, home of the Niland in Sligo, you will hear a selection of segments from an archival recording of an interview with the artist, Jack B. Yeats (1871-1957). The seventy-six-year-old Jack flew to London in the winter of 1947. It was his first time on an airplane, as he was to record an interview with his friend, Thomas MacGreevy (1893-1967), for a BBC radio arts show, called the Third Programme. This show was broadcast the following year in May 1948.

Curator and writer, Thomas MacGreevy was a pivotal figure within the Irish arts scene. He was the director of the National Gallery of Ireland from 1950 to 1963 and was a constant advocate for Jack’s work. In this interview, broadcast over seventy years ago, Jack speaks about his development as an artist and the special significance that Sligo held for him.

This archival audio recording is part of the Sound & Moving Image Catalogue in the British Library (T7655R/1 C1). Jack B. Yeats scholar and musicologist, Dr John Purser kindly helped with the rediscovery of this archival audio recording for this podcast series, as there appears to be only one other recording of the artist’s voice in existence, which we will hear in a later episode of this series.

The soundtrack for this series, ‘no man’s land,’ is composed by Karen Power, as a commission by The Model in 2020. This 8-channel sound installation is based on Power’s field recordings, which uncovers and musically highlights the unique sonic profile of the Sligo seaboard.

Series Credits:

Funded by the Decades of Centenaries Programme (2013-2023)
Researcher: Dr John Purser
Producer & Researcher-Writer for the podcast series: Lara Byrne
Podcast episodes, introduced by Isabel Claffey
Sound Engineer: Daniel Bannon
Sound Editor: Colm Condron
Soundtrack, ‘no man’s land,’ (2020) composed by Karen Power
Curated by the Artistic Director of The Model – Emer McGarry

Encounters with Jack B. Yeats
Episode 1 - Jack B. Yeats 150

In this first episode from the series of podcasts, ‘Encounters with Jack B. Yeats,’ from The Model, home of the Niland in Sligo, you will hear a selection of segments from an archival recording of an interview with the artist, Jack B. Yeats (1871-1957). The seventy-six-year-old Jack flew to London in the winter of 1947. It was his first time on an airplane, as he was to record an interview with his friend, Thomas MacGreevy (1893-1967), for a BBC radio arts show, called the Third Programme. This show was broadcast the following year in May 1948.

Curator and writer, Thomas MacGreevy was a pivotal figure within the Irish arts scene. He was the director of the National Gallery of Ireland from 1950 to 1963 and was a constant advocate for Jack’s work. In this interview, broadcast over seventy years ago, Jack speaks about his development as an artist and the special significance that Sligo held for him.

This archival audio recording is part of the Sound & Moving Image Catalogue in the British Library (T7655R/1 C1). Jack B. Yeats scholar and musicologist, Dr John Purser kindly helped with the rediscovery of this archival audio recording for this podcast series, as there appears to be only one other recording of the artist’s voice in existence, which we will hear in a later episode of this series.

The soundtrack for this series, ‘no man’s land,’ is composed by Karen Power, as a commission by The Model in 2020. This 8-channel sound installation is based on Power’s field recordings, which uncovers and musically highlights the unique sonic profile of the Sligo seaboard.

Series Credits:

Funded by the Decades of Centenaries Programme (2013-2023)
Researcher: Dr John Purser
Producer & Researcher-Writer for the podcast series: Lara Byrne
Podcast episodes, introduced by Isabel Claffey
Sound Engineer: Daniel Bannon
Sound Editor: Colm Condron
Soundtrack, ‘no man’s land,’ (2020) composed by Karen Power
Curated by the Artistic Director of The Model – Emer McGarry

Encounters with Jack B. Yeats
Episode 2 - Go West

In this second episode from the series of podcasts, ‘Encounters with Jack B. Yeats,’ from The Model, home of the Niland in Sligo, artists, Ruth Clinton and Niamh Moriarty present GO WEST, a short story set on a westbound train, where a wistful young artist shares a cabin with a stoic bureaucrat. The artist is instantly enthralled by the red-haired female civil servant sitting opposite him. Meanwhile, outside the window a magnificent round tower appears in the distance as the train crosses the sea to a remote island.

This radio play was inspired by a painting by Jack B. Yeats, ‘Man on a Train, Thinking,’ (1927) and a grisly ghost story told by the artist at the annual RHA dinner. This surreal comedy plays out between two conflicting projections of Irish national identity as it was being constructed in the early days of Irish Independence. Blending historical research and present-day conspiracies, the train is used as a metaphor for enduring binary debates such as public versus private; progress versus nostalgia; tourism versus conservation and even Dublin versus the rest of Ireland.

Ruth Clinton and Niamh Moriarty are collaborative artists currently living and working between Leitrim, and Sligo. They use performance, video, sound installation and storytelling, along with a detailed research process, to open up spaces of renewed reflection. Ruth and Niamh’s current practice is concerned with Ireland’s complicated relationship with its colonial past. In 2021, they are critically examining our struggle for a sense of national identity as we move through times of great upheaval.

They have recently presented work for Solas Nua, Washington D.C.; the Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College Dublin, and Askeaton Contemporary Arts. This year Ruth and Niamh’s work is supported by the Arts Council of Ireland, Leitrim County Council and Fingal County Council.   

Episode Credits:

GO WEST Radio Play written and produced by Ruth Clinton and Niamh Moriarty
Artist voiced by Peter Broderick
Bureaucrat voiced by Ruth Clinton
Additional voices and sounds by Cormac MacDiarmada and Niamh Moriarty
Music by Aoife Hammond & Ruth Clinton

Series Credits:

This series is kindly funded by the Decades of Centenaries Programme (2013-2023)
Episodes introduced by Isabel Claffey
Sound Engineer: Daniel Bannon
Sound Editor: Colm Condron
Soundtrack to Podcast series, ‘no man’s land,’ (2020) composed by Karen Power
Producer & researcher-writer: Lara Byrne
Curated by Emer McGarry

Encounters with Jack B. Yeats
Episode 1 - Jack B. Yeats 150

In this first episode from the series of podcasts, ‘Encounters with Jack B. Yeats,’ from The Model, home of the Niland in Sligo, you will hear a selection of segments from an archival recording of an interview with the artist, Jack B. Yeats (1871-1957). The seventy-six-year-old Jack flew to London in the winter of 1947. It was his first time on an airplane, as he was to record an interview with his friend, Thomas MacGreevy (1893-1967), for a BBC radio arts show, called the Third Programme. This show was broadcast the following year in May 1948.

Curator and writer, Thomas MacGreevy was a pivotal figure within the Irish arts scene. He was the director of the National Gallery of Ireland from 1950 to 1963 and was a constant advocate for Jack’s work. In this interview, broadcast over seventy years ago, Jack speaks about his development as an artist and the special significance that Sligo held for him.

This archival audio recording is part of the Sound & Moving Image Catalogue in the British Library (T7655R/1 C1). Jack B. Yeats scholar and musicologist, Dr John Purser kindly helped with the rediscovery of this archival audio recording for this podcast series, as there appears to be only one other recording of the artist’s voice in existence, which we will hear in a later episode of this series.

The soundtrack for this series, ‘no man’s land,’ is composed by Karen Power, as a commission by The Model in 2020. This 8-channel sound installation is based on Power’s field recordings, which uncovers and musically highlights the unique sonic profile of the Sligo seaboard.

Series Credits:

Funded by the Decades of Centenaries Programme (2013-2023)
Researcher: Dr John Purser
Producer & Researcher-Writer for the podcast series: Lara Byrne
Podcast episodes, introduced by Isabel Claffey
Sound Engineer: Daniel Bannon
Sound Editor: Colm Condron
Soundtrack, ‘no man’s land,’ (2020) composed by Karen Power
Curated by the Artistic Director of The Model – Emer McGarry