25 Jan. 2017

The Art of Drawing with Michael Wann - A short note

31st of January – 7th March 2017

2.30 – 4.30pm Advanced

€120 six week course

“Wann’s work is imbued with feeling and memories of the experience of being in the places he draws so skillfully” – Brenda Moore-McCann, Irish Arts Review.

Michael Wann, a celebrated Sligo-based artist will be holding ‘The Art of Drawing with Michael Wann’ a 6 week master class course in The Model, Sligo. The drawing classes commence on the 31st of January and will come to a close on the 7th of March. Michael Wann’s classes have long been a fixture of The Model’s programme as Michael provides his students with excellent expertise, a new skill-set and positive encouragement to explore your artistic side.

Why you should take Michael class?

That’s a fair question. We would not expect you to take classes from an instructor with no credentials, the same way you wouldn’t take etiquette lessons from Trump. Luckily Michael has a long list of achievements and experience to put your mind at ease. Here are just some of the honours and accolades Michael has garnered along his journey of artistic exploration:

Since graduating from the Sligo Institute of Technology in 2003, Wann has exhibited continuously in numerous solo and group shows. In 2004, his work was selected for the Royal Hibernian Academy (RHA) Annual Exhibition. He won the AXA Insurance Drawing Prize at the RHA Annual in 2006 and was an invited artist to the Exhibition in 2009. He also had a solo exhibition “Humble Remains,” at the RHA’s Ashford Gallery in 2009. Other prizes followed in 2010 when his work was selected by Hughie O’Donoghue for the Tom Caldwell Drawing Prize at the Royal Ulster Academy’s Annual Exhibition. Wann was also awarded the Sean Keating Prize and Silver Medal at last year’s 186th Annual at the Royal Hibernian Academy & has the honor of being invited back to the R.H.A. this year.

His work is held in both private and public collections in Ireland and Britain, France, Australia, New Zealand and the United States.

Who should take “The Art of Drawing by Michael Wann?

Another great question. Wann’s classes are aimed at any one with a basic level of drawing experience, however if you are a complete beginner and passionate about learning to draw, this class is definitely for you. On what the class entails, Wann remarked, “The class aims to encourage participants to enjoy the act of observing and drawing in an easy going and informal atmosphere.”

The classes could also be a perfect gift for a creative friend or family member. Give the gift of artistic confidence and send a loved one to Wann’s classes, where they will up their skill level in the safe hands of a talented & highly experienced artist.

How to sign up:

To book a place on “The Art of Drawing” you can contact Michael directly on: 087 9303528 or email: studio@michaelwann.com

Posted By

Rebecca Kennedy

13 Jan. 2017

New spring cinema programme with Sligo Film Society

The Model Cinema which runs in partnership with Sligo Film Society – one of the longest running in the country – returns this January to it’s usual Thursday evening slot with a packed programme of the latest and best in international and independent film.

The spring season opens on Thursday 12 January with the Polish/French drama ‘The Innocents’, set in a Warsaw convent just months after the end of WWII, a young French Red Cross doctor is approached to assist a group of nuns in a distressing state. Directed and written by veteran filmmaker Anne Fontaine, the film forms part a strong sub-stream in the programme of work by women or featuring leading female stories. Following ‘The Innocents’ is Irish comedy/drama ‘A Date for Mad Mary’ starring up-and-coming actor Seana Kerslake in the title role and Mia Hansen Løve’s “Things to Come”, whose lead actor Isabelle Huppert had a bumper year in 2016 and was recently a winner at the Golden Globes.

There are further highlights from big-name directors such as Ken Loach’s Palme D’Or winner ‘I, Daniel Blake’ from Cannes; Jim Jarmusch made a return to our screens with two films last year, the latter of these ‘Paterson’ is presented in the new programme starring hot property Adam Driver; Kenneth Lonergan also made a return with ‘Manchester by the Sea’ and is currently snapping up award nominations in this period known as the Hollywood silly season. Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, whose work has been shown previously at The Model, also feature this season with ‘The Unknown Girl’, which revels in a striking performance from lead Adèle Haenel. Andrea Arnold’s epic road movie ‘American Honey’ just fresh off the festival circuit brings an energetic number to the programme about a tale of rag-tag bunch of teen magazine hustlers trouping across the American mid-west.

At the other end of the scale, much notice has been bestowed on breakout film ‘The Childhood of the Leader’ from first-time director Brady Corbett. Based on a short story by Jean Paul Sarte it is the chilling story of the makings of a fascist leader, set amidst the backdrop of the Versaille Treaty negotiations. The spectre of war features in two further films Aleksander Sokurov’s fiction/documentary hybrid ‘Fancofonia’ which revisits the Louvre in Nazi occupied France and true story ‘The Fencer’, a redemptive account of Endel Nelis, a champion fencer forced to flee from Russian secret police who becomes a teacher and father-figure to traumatised students – mostly war orphans – at a remote Estonia school.

Fans of comedy will not be disappointed either, quirky foster-father and son tale ‘The Hunt for the Wilderpeople’ is big-hearted and full of magic and rounding off the programme is Spanish family drama cum road movie caper ‘The Olive Tree’ which will bring the season to a close on 13th April.

All screenings commence at 8pm and The Gallery Café is open beforehand serving small plates, wine and hot drinks. Individual tickets for each film are available from Sligo Film Society prior to each film or alternatively a full season pass can also be purchased. See our cinema page for more details http://themodel.ie/film

Full Spring programme listing:

The Innocents | 12 Jan.
A Date for Mad Mary | 19 Jan.
Things to Come | 26 Jan.
I, Daniel Blake | 2 Feb.
Paterson | 9 Feb.
The Childhood of a Leader | 16 Feb.
The Hunt for the Wilderpeople | 23 Feb.
The Unknown Girl | 2 Mar.
Hell or High Water | 9 Mar.
The Fencer | 16 Mar.
American Honey | 23 Mar.
Francofonia | 30 Mar.
Manchester by the Sea | 6 Apr.
The Olive Tree | 13 Apr.

Posted By

Edel Doherty

11 Jan. 2017

Graphite & Easel: A review

Graphite and Easel is a life-drawing classes led by Artist Emma Stroude. It takes place in The Model on Fridays at 10.30 am. To resurrect whatever waning artistic talent I may have left, I decided to give Emma’s class a go. Life drawing for some is the most essential of all artistic practices. It trains its students in a variety of skills like shape and form, space, line, colour and texture, components that are crucial for any artist’s repertoire. Because I haven’t been to a life-drawing class in quite some time, I am a little too eager and I arrive at Emma’s class at 10 on the dot. Thank god, she’s already in the education room with a friend, setting the stage.

“So, who’s the model?” I ask, secretly hoping for a woman because men are impossibly boring to draw (they’re just a couple of straight lines with a lumpy bit after all).

“You’re getting the best model,” Emma’s friend informs me.

“Who’s that then?”

“Me!” she tells me.

The class starts to fill up around 10.15 so any newcomers interested in attending Graphite & Easel are advised to arrive that little bit earlier. There’s a pretty big crowd but there’s plenty of easels to go around. Emma takes to the middle of the class to give us the low-down on the schedule. We are to do a series of warm-up sketches to get us moving, then our model will pose for longer periods of time followed by a short break.

“No problem,” I think, “Sure, I’ll be a little bit rusty but I can shake that off in the preliminaries.”

Oh, how wrong I was. During the warm-up poses I can’t quite believe how good I am not. In fact, some sort of clinical separation between body and mind seems to be at play here. My brain knows what it perceives and what it would like but my hand refuses to oblige. When did my fingers become sausages? Why can’t I draw? Who has done this to me?

Our Model seems to be switching poses with rapid speed. I glance around at my classmates to find that I seem to be the only one breaking a sweat. The other students are as calm and focused at Buddhist monks. Am I the only one who believes that our Model is not so much posing as vogueing?
It turns out I am. And that’s because I’m out of practice. I stumble upon this conclusion when we have a short intermission and Emma encourages us to take a waltz around and view each other’s work. When I take my turn around the room I discover that although I may have struggled, my classmates had no such issues. All levels are welcome at Graphite & Easel, and every group is represented here. From shy beginners to the very the intimidating masters, we are all accounted for but the overall standard of work at Graphite & Easel is excellent.

So much so that your dear correspondent took one look at her neighbour’s haunting charcoals drawings and fled the room, rather then having to stick around and justify the glorified stick-woman I’d managed. I took solace in the café and chatted to others from the group. Everyone was friendly and the atmosphere is one of goodwill and encouragement. When our break is over, we filed back into the education room; I was ready for round two. It’s easier than the first half, partly because I’ve warmed up and partly because I left my massive ego at the door.

Graphite & Easel takes place in The Model on Fridays from 20 Jan.
10.30am – 1pm, €10 per session.

Posted By

Rebecca Kennedy

3 Jan. 2017

2016 - The Education round-up

2016 has been a great year for The Model, with a kaleidoscope of art and cultural events taking place in the beautiful surroundings of The Model throughout the year. People of all ages have been attending our exciting mix of events and projects, ranging from music to film, artist talks, seminars, children’s workshops, an exciting teenage programme, supported by Sligo Credit Union and a number of unique community-engagement and education projects. With education and community projects leading the way, Punc 1×1, The Model’s new primary schools outreach programme and Sligo Global Kitchen have without a doubt been the hits of 2016.

Sligo Global Kitchen is a community art project engaging residents of Globe House (the region’s direct provision centre for asylum seekers) in an amazing culinary and cultural experience. Led by locally-based artist Anna Spearman. Sligo Global Kitchen uses the social relations of food and art to engage residents of Globe House in a meaningful cultural exchange with Sligo’s communities. Experiencing the best of multi-cultural cuisine, the whole concept is based on the principle of hospitality, a cornerstone of Irish culture and values, which is equally important in other cultures. Sligo Global Kitchen is a gesture of solidarity to people living in direct provision in this town and it’s a celebration of the commonality that the every day rituals of cooking and food brings to Sligo. As Sligo is becoming a more diverse and multi-cultural society, the communal table at the heart of Global Kitchen is a fantastic vehicle for enriching Sligo’s cultural life. Sligo Global Kitchen meet monthly at The Model and also appear in pop up venues throughout the county.

Meanwhile in Sligo’s primary schools, a ground-breaking project has been unfolding throughout the county. Punc 1×1, an acronym meaning Pop-Up Niland Collection is a major outreach schools’ programme taking place in the academic year 2016/2017. Children and their communities from all over Sligo are encountering original artworks in their schools. The Model education team have been busy visiting schools throughout the county as this pop up exhibition rolls out, one art work at a time in ten participating schools. The brainchild of curator Jobst Graeves, this project will eventually touch every child in the county in the next seven years. The positive impact of this project has already seen numbers of school visits to The Model more than double in the last few months. And if the schools can’t come to The Model, distance often being a barrier to participation, The Model will come to the schools. The project is inspirational and will continue to make waves across the county in 2017, culminating in an final exhibition of all the artworks in The Model in June, 2017 to mark the end of the first year of this dynamic educational schools programmme.
The Model has been delighted to have received funding to support Punc 1×1 and Sligo Global Kitchen from The Community Foundation for Ireland,. A long-term commitment from the foundation has resourced The Model in a way that has allowed us to think outside the box and to take steps in ways we woudn’t have been able to imagine without this support.

Our aim this year was to continue to engage everyone in the North West in exciting art projects, from the very small to the very tall – to make, create and experience art. No matter what age you are, no matter what level of experience you have, The Model aims to always be a place for everyone. The Model is not just a space, but an art and cultural experience that can touch you, in many ways. The Model will continue to deliver programmes into 2017 that we hope will bring joy and learning to all who participate and attend events at The Model. The Model receives core funding from the Sligo County Council and the Arts Council of Ireland.

20 Dec. 2016

A seasonal sing-along screening for families at The Model cinema

Special Family Day with Secret Sing-along Screening

Wed 28 December

•Printmaking workshop, post-holiday celebrations and story-telling from 11.30a.m.
•Free secret sing-along film screening for families at 1p.m.

The Model are holding a top-secret movie screening and some post-holiday celebrations for all the family on Wednesday December 28th. The event is part of a special edition of Family Day and takes place from 11.30am-3pm with a top secret sing-along screening at 1pm. Our sources can reveal that the film in question is of a recent movie, and that children age two to ten agree it’s already a classic. It’s the perfect way to spend an hour or two out of the cold this festive season. Get cosy in the Model Cinema with some seasonal sing-along fun! The screening is free to attend and all are welcome.

The Gallery Cafe will be open, for all your hot chocolate and cupcakes needs. Children and their minders will also have a chance get creative, explore printmaking, participate in a dance competition, and enjoy a fireside storytelling session. Those wishing to attend the craft workshops are advised to register in advance, as places are limited, and there is a small fee to cover materials.

Take the whole family and make your way to The Model (if you’re not too busy building snowmen!)

Posted By

Rebecca Kennedy

9 Dec. 2016

Sligo Global Kitchen with Pulled

Pulled Screen Print in association with Sligo Global Kitchen are holding their second ‘Cult of the Night’ print party this Friday, December 9th at their studios at the Model, Sligo. Attendees will be treated to a special food menu with culinary delights from across the world presented by the expert team at Sligo Global Kitchen. There will be live screen printing of festive cards and live vinyl DJs. Booking is strictly limited to 20 places and are available from Pulled’s Facebook page or by emailing info@pulled.ie

Sligo Global Kitchen is a cooking venture that opens its doors to everyone in the community especially those living in Direct Provision to meet, cook and eat. ALL are WELCOME!

Posted By

Rebecca Kennedy

8 Nov. 2016

My Pick - Irene Geelan

It’s funny, I’ve been to most of The Model’s previous exhibitions but I had never seen ‘Mountain Window’ by Jack B. Yeats. I had seen it in a lovely, little catalogue that the Niland produced and I really loved it. I used to come in, this was going on for several years, hoping that I would see the real painting but it was never seemed be on display. Then on Heritage Week, I went to a story telling session in Grange and there was a little shop where Imelda was reading a story. At the end of her storytelling she mentioned some other events that would be happening for Heritage week and she mentioned that ‘Painted Universe’ was on. I asked her if ‘Mountain Window’ would be on part of that exhibition. She said it should be so that day I came and Heike was the guide.

I told her that I’d only ever seen ‘Mountain Window’ in a book and when I finally got to see it, it was almost like an emotional connection with the painting. I don’t know why, I just wanted to see the painting so much. I had talked to Mick about it (Irene’s husband) and he said, “Well, if you like it so much, I will paint it for you.“ So, from the image of Mountain Window in the catalogue he painted me a copy of ‘Mountain Window’. For two or three years it’s been up on the wall in our house, so I really wanted to see the original.

I think I love the painting because of the mountain subject matter. When you see it, it feels like you are in the room looking out the window and it feels very warm and secure. You can sense other people in the room, too. Whatever about it, it had that domestic feeling to it. It just felt familiar but it wasn’t one of those tourist-type paintings either. You can see this was Jack’s feeling about this mountain; he really captured the emotion of it. To see the real one was great. You think, is it going to be as wonderful in reality? The first time I saw it I was very pleased. There’s something lovely about it and it’s not too complicated. I just feel that I have an emotional connection with ‘Mountain Window.’

Posted By

Rebecca Kennedy

21 Oct. 2016

The Allingham Festival

Here at The Model, we like to think of ourselves as your number one Arts institute. Indeed, we like to believe that we cater to all your artistic/cultural/ entertainment needs and that the relationship you have with us is well…exclusive. Alas, we know that not to be the case. To have your needs met, you, our adoring public, must see other Arts institutions. As much as it pains us, we try to understand. It is only when we are faced with an institution playing host to a festival, exhibition or event so fantastic, that your straying away becomes a bit justifiable and thus the sting of your betrayal becomes that little less painful.

There are many great festivals and events to cheat on us with but the one that we feel is of special note, is The Allingham Festival. The Allingham Festival takes place in The Abbey Centre, Ballyshannon, Co. Donegal from Thursday, Nov. 3 to Sunday Nov. 6. With an eclectic mixture of workshops, lectures and concerts, The Allingham boosts something for everyone. Past years have gained the festival a reputation for hosting a unique collection of artists and acts and this year is sure not to disappoint.

Some of the highlights of this year’s festival include but are not limited to: A lecture on the refugee crisis by investigative reporter, Valerie Cox, a workshop with Model favorites, ‘FAB LAB,’ a professional development workshop with the Irish Writers’ Centre and Anne Enright, Man Booker prize winner and Laureate for Irish Fiction, will take part in a public interview with Sinéad Gleeson (‘The Book Show’ on RTE). Topics for discussion will include Enright’s novel ‘The Green Road’ and her other writing, the Laureateship, and the state of writing in Ireland today. Plus, Former Board member and great friend of The Model, Kieran Quinn, will be Headlining The Allingham concert with special guest reader, Anne Enright.

For more information or tickets for any of The Allingham Festival events are available on The Allingham website: www.allinghamfestival.com

Posted By

Rebecca Kennedy

20 Oct. 2016

The Waterford Healing Arts Trust comes to The Model, Sligo

Mary Grehan and Claire Meaney, Arts Directors of one of Ireland’s leading Arts and Health programme, the Waterford Healing Arts Trust (WHAT), are coming to Sligo for a three-day residency at The Model from 25th – 27th October.

Established in 1993 and based at University Hospital Waterford, WHAT supports the development of arts and health practice in Ireland through training, advice and artsandhealth.ie, the national arts and health website. Between them Mary and Claire have over 25 years experience of curating arts programmes in a range of healthcare settings including acute hospitals and mental health settings.

During their time at the Model, Mary and Claire will share their experience of running arts and health programmes via free advice clinics on 26 October in the Gallery Café at The Model and visit similar programmes in the North West. They will also facilitate an Introduction to Arts & Health, a one day training programme for artists and healthcare professionals who are new to the area of arts and health.

The residency will conclude with the launch of An Introduction of Arts and Health // 10 Things to Consider , a short publication by Mary Grehan which describes the various aspects of arts and health practice, offers guidelines for good practice and signposts readers to further information. This will take place at The Model at 5pm on Thursday, 27th October. All are welcome to attend.

An Introduction of Arts and Health // 10 Things to Consider will be launched by Niamh O’Connor an artist and arts coordinator for the Arts Initiative in Mental Health, a programme of Sligo Leitrim Mental Health Services.

In the words of Mary Grehan, Arts Director of WHAT, ‘Sligo County Council was the first local authority in Ireland to publish an arts and health strategy and in the light of this and the personal relationships we have built up over the years in the north west, we are very much looking forward to our residency at The Model. This is not just about sharing our experience but also being inspired and reinvigorated by the work of others in the field of arts and health.’
If you are interested in meeting Mary and Claire during their residency at The Model, please e-mail info@artsandhealth.ie to book your place.
For more information on the work of the Waterford Healing Arts Trust / artsandhealth.ie phone 051-842664 or see www.waterfordhealingarts.com and www.artsandhealth.ie.

Posted By

Rebecca Kennedy

18 Oct. 2016

My Pick - Barbara Breitenfellner

What really struck me about ‘Johnny Patterson singing Bridget Donoghue’ is that it is so far removed from the aesthetic of the rest of the exhibition, Painted Universe. The other paintings seem pretty conventional in comparison and when I saw this I was really thrilled. The desperate violence of the face reminded me of The Scream by Edvard Munch, but also of the photographic series of monstrous clowns by Cindy Sherman. It is a face falling apart in horror. Then you look at the title and see, ‘Johnny Patterson singing Red O’ Donohue’.

When you think of a singing clown, it sounds kind of nice you know. A clown is a kind of a children’s entertainer. But then you examine this painting and that concept completely flips. I found it fascinating how he treats the paint. I think that it ventures so far from his usual style, the way that he is using the brush and really going into the paint by stirring it. Also, you have to examine the way he uses colour. Particularly yellow, which is one of the brightest, sunniest colours that you can imagine. But here, Yeats’ is mixing it with all these dark colors until it becomes contaminated. Transforming it into a dirty yellow, that, in the context of this painting, is utterly sad. It shows a remarkable depth of despair.

When I was researching this painting, I came across a text by Roisin Kennedy on The Model’s website. The text stated that the painting was inspired by Yeats’ first memory of seeing the clown perform but he was also reflecting on the role of the artist, which made complete sense to me. The clown is standing before an audience, trying to entertain them and I think that is a great image. In that sense Yeats’ painting could be read as a distorted, absurd and ironic representation of exhibiting art and being an artist.

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Posted By

Rebecca Kennedy